Create a Realistic Kitchen – Part 2 of 2

Introduction to rendering with LuxRender

Length:
42 minutes
Software:
Blender 2.5
Difficulty:
Advanced
Rate:
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 4.7/5 (43 votes cast)

This 43 minute tutorial will teach you:

  • How to install LuxRender and render your first scene
  • The benefits of using external renderers over Blender’s internal renderer
  • 3 different environment settings and their use
  • How to apply materials to multiple objects at once
  • How to pause a render
  • How to use lightgroups to adjust lighting in real time
  • How to enable real world camera settings in LuxRender
  • How to add bloom and glare to a finished render

Last week we finished modelling the kitchen scene, and this week we’re going to render it :)

Now when it comes to rendering interiors, the Blender internal engine unfortunately falls a bit short. Global illumination is crucial to achieving realism and that’s something that Blender currently lacks. So for this tutorial, we will be exporting the scene to an external renderer called LuxRender.

If you are new to external renderers, don’t worry! The first 8 minutes is a complete Introduction to External Rendering, which answers the most common questions beginners have.

This 43 minute tutorial will teach you:

  • How to install LuxRender and render your first scene
  • The benefits of using external renderers over Blender’s internal renderer
  • 3 different environment settings and their use
  • How to apply materials to multiple objects at once
  • How to pause a render
  • How to use lightgroups to adjust lighting in real time
  • How to enable real world camera settings in LuxRender
  • How to add bloom and glare to a finished render

Note: This tutorial is Part 2. Click here to watch Part 1.

At a Glance

Screenshots from the video:

Chapter marks

Bored? If you know what you’re doing, feel free to skip ahead!

  • 0:28 – Introduction to External Renderers
  • 8:33 – How to Install LuxRender
  • 10:26  – Rendering your first scene in LuxRender
  • 18:07 – Kitchen Tutorial start
  • 19:36 – Adding the materials
  • 28:44 – Setting up the Lighting and environment
  • 36:10 – Adding bloom, glare and playing with LightGroups

Note: The LuxRender script may not be able to locate the floor and bench textures. If so, unpack the textures from the .blend and tell the script to use a directory on your hard drive.

Congratulations on completing the architecture tutorial series! I hope you’ve taken something from it. As usual I’m looking forward to seeing your results :)

Need some Inspiration?

Further Reading:

Create a Realistic Kitchen - Part 2 of 2, 4.7 out of 5 based on 43 ratings

About Andrew Price

User of Blender for 9+ years. I've written tutorials for 3d World Magazine and spoken at three Blender conferences. My goal is to help artists get employed in the industry by making training accessible and easy to understand. I'm an Aussie and I live in South Korea ;)
  • Drew Hilstad

    Cycles has come a long ways in a year….it took 5 days to render last year it took 5 hours to render this.

  • fergus

    I had a crack at rendering the scene in cycles. I made an observation that should be taken into account for anyone using cycles. when I’m making a metal material, I use glossy BSDF but when the roughness is at 0.000, the reflections are sharp and unrealistic, and I find for a good material, you need to set the roughness to at least 0.100, if not more.

  • fergus

    seeing this has inspired me to model my own kitchen scene. I rendered it with cycles. I included a window and behind the window was a plane with an outdoors image on it. I gave it an emission value of 5, for the illusion that outside there was light lighting up the inside.

  • RandomUsername

    Yeah, I understand the long render times now… I tried to make a water sim in Cycles (BTW now there’s cycles, what’s better, lux or cycles?) and it was just 8 seconds and it took me something aroung 48 hours to render :( I had to turn off caustics because with all the glass at 1000 samples (30 mintes PER FRAME!!!!) it was still noisy, without caustics I managed to get away with 300 samples, av. 13 minutes per frame. However, go to aws.amazon.com and find the EC2 service, and for just 1$ or so per hour you can have the equivalent of 20 cpus! BUT cycles didn’t work for me :(

    • emterbulentse

      I like lux way better than cycles. one of the reasons is that lux is very slow at rendering, but unlike cycles, doesn’t slow down my computer(or to my knowlege anyway) and produces really nice results, but I guess both are considerable competition for external renderers anyway.

  • http://www.aquariumbackgroundse.com aquasource part

    Write more, thats all I have to say. Literally, it seems as
    though you relied on the video to make your point.

    You clearly know what youre talking about, why throw away your intelligence on just posting videos to your
    weblog when you could be giving us something informative to read?

  • danx

    Wow, your skills with blender and LuxRender are awesome. Thank you so much for using your valuable time to help countless others improve their Blender knowledge.

    My interests focus on lighting and architecture and this ‘realistic kitchen’ tut has given me great encouragement. Especially good was the intro on LuxRender and it’s features.

    Personally I don’t think your tutorials drag on or are too lengthy. Really, how can someone complain, you give your years of experience, joyfully, kindly, without cost!!