How to Make a Rainy Window

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Tags - Particles, Photorealistic
Software:
  • Blender 2.66a
Discover How To:
  • Model rain drops
  • Realistically texture a wet pane of glass
  • Use depth of field effectively

Chapter Marks (Full Length )

modelling icon31.53modelling icon312.30modelling icon323.23icon-lighting28.24icon-lighting36.12compositing47.12
Software:
  • Blender 2.66a
Discover How To:
  • Model rain drops
  • Realistically texture a wet pane of glass
  • Use depth of field effectively

Chapter Marks (Full Length )

modelling icon31.53modelling icon312.30modelling icon323.23icon-lighting28.24icon-lighting36.12compositing47.12

Final Result

Download the Finished .blend

Resources:

Hope you enjoyed the tutorial! If you made something awesome with it, feel free to post it in the comments below :)
Read the Russian Translation

Summary

Making the Rain Drops

Delete the default cube and lamp, and replace with a plane rotated at 90 degrees.

 

Position the camera front on to the plane.

 

Move to a new layer and add a UV sphere.

 

In side view mode, rotate the sphere 90 degrees. Then go in to top view, edit mode, and select the bottom most vertex.

 

Using proportional editing (O), move the vertex inwards, to create a squashed droplet.

 

Split the view to a UV image editor and load in this reference image. Duplicate the rain drop and start to model a droplet based off the reference image.

 

Model 6-8 more droplets based off the reference images. Set the shader to smooth.

 

Select all the droplets and press Ctrl+G to form a group. In the toolbar, name it Rain Drops.

 

Assign it a material with a glass shader, and apply it to all the droplets.

 

The Droplet Particle System

Add a particle system, set the type to Hair and check Advanced:

 

Set the rest of the particle settings as shown:

 

Creating the running droplets

Go back to the layer with the droplets, and duplicate the first one.

 

Select the top vertices as shown:

 

Extrude it upwards:

 

Scale the top part in so that it tapers off slightly:

 

Create a bunch of loopcuts (Ctrl+R) as shown. Download this reference image and load it into a split view image editor.

 

Using the image as reference, create a squiggly line by pushing and pulling vertices around:

 

For more squiggliness, add a subsurf modifier, then a displacement modifier with these settings:

 

Change the displacement texture size to 0.55:

 

Go into weight paint mode and paint the whole object red (value 1) except for the droplet head which should be blue (value 0). Now set the displacement vertex group to Group.

 

Create two more variants of that squiggly droplet by simply pushing and pulling around verticies:

 

Form a group out of the new droplets and call it Long Drops.

 

Go back to the glass and add a copy the old particle system, but name it Long Drops.

 

Change these settings:

 

Setting the scene

Position the camera close to the plane as shown:

 

Assign a material to the plane and give it a glass shader:

 

Add a Circle object (with a fill face) and place it above the glass as shown:

 

Assign an Emission material to the circle with these settings:

 

 

Select the plane, go into edit mode and press U to UV unwrap it:

 

Go to the node editor, add an Image Texture node, load in this custom texture and connect it to the Roughness input of the Glass shader.

 

Yay! Water trails!

 

Add a new Image Texture node and load in this texture. Connect it to the other texture with a MixRGB node with these settings:

 

Add a ColorRamp node and place it between the Multiply node and the new texture node. Move the black slide to the middle and set the white color to a mid-grey (this will reduce the amount of roughness).

 

Yeah makin’ progress!

Tiny Droplets

For a more misty effect, we’ll add some physical tiny droplets.

Go to the layer with all the other droplets, and add an Icosphere (to keep it low poly).

 

Go into edit mode and squish it against the origin point as we did earlier.

 

Create one or two variants:

 

Select all the new droplets, press Ctrl+G and name the group Tiny Droplets.

 

Assign the same droplet material as before.

 

Go back to the glass, and copy the same particle settings from the first system, but make these changes:

 

Huzzah. Tiny droplets.

Huzzah! Tiny droplets.

Background Lights

Now we’ll create some out of focus lighting for the background.

Start by adding a sphere into the background far behind the plane and camera:

 

Give it an emission type, with a strength of 20 and color of orange.

 

Nice. Now let’s do more.

 

Create a bunch more spheres of varying sizes, colors, and strengths:

 

Like Christmas

 

Final Touches

The funnest part of this scenes comes from the Depth of Field.

Add an empty and place it on the droplet that you want to be in focus. Name the empty Dof.

 

With the camera selected, set the focus point to Dof, the Aperture to F/Stop 1 and Blades 8 (which makes more interesting Bokeh)

 

Noice

 

This is completely optional, but feel free to add some vignette and sharpening in the compositor:

 

Finished!

Finished!

 

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